Former James Beard Award Official Explains Why She Was Scared to Tell Anyone She Had Breast Cancer - Food & Beverage Magazine

Former James Beard Award Official Explains Why She Was Scared to Tell Anyone She Had Breast Cancer

Former James Beard Award Official Explains Why She Was Scared to Tell Anyone She Had Breast CancerMelanie Young, former James Beard Award official, was diagnosed in 2009 with breast cancer. She was scared to share her diagnosis with her coworkers, clients and even some of her family. Melanie shares more of her story in her new book, “Getting Things Off My Chest: A Survivor’s Guide to Staying Fearless and Fabulous in the Face of Breast Cancer.”

Melanie Young is a woman in motion, and she did not let a breast cancer diagnosis slow her down . . . just refocus. She used her cancer experience to retool her diet, ramp up her exercise regimen, rid her life from toxic stress and regain a sense of purpose through writing and speaking to empower other women facing the journey. “It took losing my breasts to find my voice,” she says on the acknowledgment page of her first book, “Getting Things Off My Chest.”

Melanie Young is on a year-long book tour across the United States. You can find dates and times on her website, www.melanieyoung.com.

About the Book:
Charge head on into the battle with breast cancer, armed with these outstanding survivor’s tips on how to stay sane, focused, and in charge. Complete with checklists geared toward streamlining your new life, this book helps you eliminate stress and boost your spirits with positive thinking and humor. Don’t let your cancer control you; empower yourself and ease the transition with this all-inclusive guide.

You can pick up a copy of “Getting Things Off My Chest,” at Books & Things, Amazon, Barnes & Noble and other great bookstores.

Former James Beard Award Official Explains Why She Was Scared to Tell Anyone She Had Breast CancerAbout Melanie Young:
Diagnosed with cancer in both breasts in 2009, Melanie Young underwent a double mastectomy with reconstruction, five months of chemotherapy, genetic testing and a prophylactic oophorectomy to remove her ovaries and Fallopian tubes. During that time she continued to run her wine and food public relations and special events business. “It was important for me to keep working because I was the primary income producer, and it was therapeutic to keep my mind challenged and active despite having bouts of chemo-brain,” Young relates. “I could not just ‘take it easy’ and there was no way I was going to take my cancer lying down. My goal was to stand up to my cancer and use the experience to build a strong person inside and out and understand what changes I needed to make to live a healthier, more balanced life moving forward.”

Follow Melanie on Twitter and at www.melanieyoung.com.

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